The Loss of All Things

In the third chapter of his letter to the Philippians Paul discusses the subject of "confidence in the flesh." To have confidence in the flesh is to rely on one's birth, station in life, education and accomplishments. If anyone could be justified in doing this, it would be Paul (Philippians 3:3-8). He was from a "right" family and was well educated. The expression "a Hebrew of the Hebrews" is indicative of the ability to speak Hebrew, a rarity in the first century, even in the land of the Jews. He worked hard as a Pharisee and was a diligent persecutor of the church. He said, I believe sardonically, that he was blameless touching the righteousness which is in the law. He had been operating as henchman for the high priest (Acts 9). He was ambitious. There was nothing he would not do to succeed. He even looked after the coats of the murderers of Stephen and agreed that he should die (Acts 6, 7 and 8). Paul had it all. He was the man.

They Grow Up

As most folks who read this bulletin know, our oldest boy is getting married in just a few days. Ginger and I are could not be happier. It is an exciting time and a sweet time. Will found Meagan while at college at UAH and it was a superb discovery. She is a wonderful Christian girl with a good heart. Ginger has had to deal with an "all boys" world for so long that she can't wait to get another female in the family.

On The Matter of the DaVinci Code

A few years back I read, for entertainment, a novel by Dan Brown. I thought he was a talented writer of fast moving fiction, so I read the rest of his books. His most famous effort is now to be made into a movie, The Da Vinci Code. The book and movie have generated a substantial controversy as well as what seems to me to be a sizable cottage industry devoted to revealing the errors of the book (which have had the ironic effect of selling more of his book). I have hesitated to join the fray but I find that I just can't help it. So here goes.

A Prescription for Perilous Times

As Paul wrote the second letter to his prot g Timothy he provided a warning: This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come (2 Timothy 3:1). Paul meant to help Timothy even though the news he told him was not good. When the apostle spoke of the last days he spoke of the days in which he and Timothy were living. We, too, live in the last days. The "last days" are the days of the Christian dispensation (which was preceded by the Patriarchal and Mosaic periods or dispensations). When it ends, this old place will be finished (see 2 Peter 3:9ff.). Many of the problems Timothy faced in his part of the last days are still present here in out part of the last days.

How Are Feeling Today?

How are you feeling today? Pretty good? OK? Not too good? Lousy? Great? We have all had days to fit each of these responses. As Ecclesiastes 12 makes plain we expect to have a few more "not too good" days as we get older.

"Man's Brother Raised From Dead"

Can you imagine seeing this headline in your local paper? Well, anything can happen in the papers these days, local or otherwise but such a headline would indeed stir no little interest. Good Bible students know the passage I have in mind. Hebrews 2:14-18 in the NKJV reads, Inasmuch then as the children have partaken of flesh and blood, He Himself likewise shared in the same, that through death He might destroy him who had the power of death, that is, the devil, and release those who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage. For indeed He does not give aid to angels, but He does give aid to the seed of Abraham. Therefore, in all things He had to be like His brethren that He might be a merciful and faithful High Priest in things pertaining to God, to make propitiation for the sins of the people. For in that He Himself has suffered, being tempted, He is able to aid those who are tempted.

The Young Moses

Hebrews 11:23-26 provides insight into the early life of Moses, the great deliverer of God's people from Egyptian bondage. Exodus 2 is the source of the narrative account upon which this passage in Hebrews is based. The two passages together provide for us compelling instruction on the subject of living by faith.

I'm Satisfied?

Satisfaction can be a good thing. We all know the old song that speaks of being " satisfied with a little cottage below." The songwriter used a symbolic material comparison ("a gold one that's silver lined") to express the idea Heaven will be much better than anything we experience here. Jesus taught that we should not worry so much about material circumstances in Matthew 6:19-34. He said, "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added unto you" (Matthew 6:33).

Faith: The Primary Thing

Delight in Abomination